Other News for Tajik Air

  • Tajik Air closes on MA60 replacement for An-24s


    Chinese manufacturer Xian Aircraft appears to have reached an agreement to supply new MA60 turboprops to Tajikistan's...


  • News Listings for Tajik Air

  • Tajik Air closes on MA60 replacement for An-24s

    News | 01 Nov 2010 10:00 | Tom Zaitsev

    Chinese manufacturer Xian Aircraft appears to have reached an agreement to supply new MA60 turboprops to Tajikistan's national carrier Tajik Air.http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Tajik-Air-closes-on-MA60-replacement-for-An-24s-349035/
  • 1997 showed highest CFIT death total

    News | 21 Jan 1998 00:00

    <p>David Learmount/LONDON </p> <p>Having caused a record 640 fatalities in airline accidents during 1997, controlled flight into terrain (CFIT) has been confirmed as the accident category which poses the greatest danger to life. The latest figures reveal that, despite new technology and a well-orchestrated international campaign to reduce the mistakes which cause CFIT, major airlines remain vulnerable, the Flight International review of 1997 world airline safety reveals. </p> <p>A 6 August Korean Air Boeing 747-300 crash at Guam and a 26 September Garuda Indonesian Airbus A300B4 accident in Sumatra between them accounted for 462 fatalities. An AeroSvit Yakovlev Yak-42 crash near Thessaloniki in Greece killed all 70 on board, and a Tajik Air Tupolev Tu-154 crash at Sharjah, United Arab Emirates, caused 86 deaths. Preliminary information released by investigators indicates that these were CFIT accidents, and one other jet crash may yet be categorised as such. </p> <p>CFIT happens in chttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/1997-showed-highest-CFIT-death-total-31783/
  • 1997 ends badly for world airlines safety

    News | 07 Jan 1998 00:00

    <p>Five times as many people died in air-transport accidents during the second half of 1997 as in the first six months, and there were half as many again fatal accidents. Preliminary figures, however, show that overall, 1997 was close to the annual average for the decade. </p> <p>Airline fatalities for 1997 totalled about 1,270 and the number of fatal accidents was around 45.The full analysis of 1997 world airline safety, will appear in Flight International's 21-27 January issue. </p> <p>December has been particularly bad. Following the AeroSwit Yakovlev Yak-42 crash in Greece, and the Tajik Air Tupolev Tu-154 accident in Sharjah (Flight International, 24 December, 1997-6 January), on 19 December a Silk Air Boeing 737-300 (9V-TRF) disappeared, without an emergency call, in the cruise phase of its flight from Jakarta, Indonesia, to Singapore. The main wreckage has been located in the Musi river north of Palembang, Sumatra. All 104 people on board died. Wreckage is spread over some 25khttp://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/1997-ends-badly-for-world-airlines-safety-31268/
  • Navigator survives Sharjah crash

    News | 24 Dec 1997 00:00

    <p>A chartered Tajik Air Tupolev Tu-154B-2 crashed on 15 December near Sharjah in the United Arab Emirates, killing all 85 passengers and eight of the nine crew. The navigator survived. Inbound from Tajikistan, the aircraft disappeared from air-traffic-control radar screens at 1,600ft (500m) and hit the ground 13km (7nm) short of the runway. </p>http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/Navigator-survives-Sharjah-crash-30920/